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Profile of the Alaska Court System 2014 (Print-Version) Adobe Acrobat PDF logo 2 MB
Alaska Court System Annual Report FY 2013 Adobe Acrobat PDF logo 14 MB

About the Alaska Court System

The contents of this page are based in part on the Profile of the Alaska Court System.

Other Judicial Branch Agencies:

Frequently Asked Questions

Introduction

The government of the State of Alaska is divided into three separate but equal entities: the executive branch, the legislative branch, and the judicial branch. This division prevents the concentration of governmental power, by providing for checks and balances among the branches. The U.S. Constitution and the constitutions of most other states also require that governmental power be divided among three separate branches.

Although the terms judicial branch and court system are often used interchangeably, in fact, the judicial branch contains three separate entities: the Alaska Court System, the Alaska Judicial Council, and the Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct.

Alaska has a unified, centrally administered court system, totally funded by the state. Municipal governments do not maintain separate court systems. There are four levels of courts in the Alaska Court System, each with different powers, duties and responsibilities. The Superior Court and District Court are trial courts, which initially hear and decide court cases. The Supreme Court and Court of Appeals are appellate courts, which review and decide appeals from decisions made by the trial courts. Title 22 of the Alaska Statutes sets out the jurisdiction and responsibilities of each court.

The Supreme Court and the Superior Court were established in the Alaska Constitution. In 1959, the legislature created a District Court for each judicial district and granted power to the Supreme Court to increase or decrease the number of District Court judges. In 1980, the legislature created the Court of Appeals.

The Chief Justice of the Alaska Supreme Court is the administrative head of the Alaska Court System. An administrative director is appointed by the chief justice with concurrence of the Supreme Court. The director supervises the administration of all courts in the state.

The Supreme Court sets out the rules governing the administration of all courts and the rules of practice and procedure for civil and criminal cases.

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What is a Court Case

A court case is a dispute that goes to court. The court is asked to decide (1) what the facts are, and (2) how the laws of Alaska apply to the facts. There are two main kinds of cases: civil cases and criminal cases.

Civil law deals with relationships between individuals. (A corporation is an "individual" under the law.) The word suit simply refers to a civil court case and to sue means to start a civil lawsuit. The State of Alaska, just like an individual, can bring a civil action. An example of a civil case is a suit resulting from an automobile accident. One person sues another person for damages to the car or for personal injury due to the accident. Other examples of civil cases are suits to collect money, suits for divorce, and suits to recover property.

Criminal law deals with cases brought by the federal, state, city, or borough government against a person who has done something against the interest of all people in the community. The government charges an individual with violating a criminal law and brings a court action to decide guilt and impose a punishment. The charging of a person with a crime and bringing him to trial is called a prosecution. The prosecution for all cases under criminal law must be brought in the name of the federal, state, city, or borough government, even though the case may be started by the complaint of a private person — called the complainant. Some examples of crimes are murder, assault, disorderly conduct, and driving under the influence.

An event or action can result in both criminal and civil cases. For example, a person who steals a snow machine and wrecks it could be prosecuted by the state for the crime of theft and sued in a civil action for damages by the owner of the snow machine. The state, through the use of the courts, could bring a criminal action to punish the person through a fine, a prison term, or both. The owner could demand in a civil court case that the thief pay for the wrecked snow machine.

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How are Judges Chosen?

The Alaska constitution provides for the selection of judges by merit; that is, judges are selected on the basis of their qualifications, rather than on their political or social connections. Alaska was one of the first states to adopt merit selection of judges. Today, over thirty other states select some or all of their judges in this way.

The Alaska Judicial Council, an independent citizens’ commission, investigates and evaluates applicants for judicial positions for all courts except magistrate judge courts. The council sends the names of the most qualified applicants to the governor for final selection. The governor must make an appointment from this list. (Magistrate judges are selected according to a different process.)

After serving for a specified period of time, all justices and judges in Alaska must stand periodically for approval by voters on a non-partisan ballot in a general election. This is called retention. The Judicial Council evaluates the performance of judicial officers standing for retention election and provides detailed information to the public - possibly more than any other jurisdiction in the world - and makes recommendations to the voters regarding retention. In preparing its recommendations, the council surveys attorneys, peace and probation officers, court employees, and others regarding the conduct of individual judges.

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Other Justice System Participants

This introductory profile discusses the roles of justices, judges and magistrate judges in the court system. However, many persons who are not part of the court system are involved with the larger justice system. For example:

Some lawyers have special titles. A lawyer who is appointed by the court to represent a defendant in a criminal case because the defendant cannot afford to hire his or her own lawyer is usually employed by the Public Defender Agency and referred to as an Assistant Public Defender. In general, a lawyer who represents the State of Alaska in a criminal case is an Assistant District Attorney, and a lawyer who represents the state in a civil case is an Assistant Attorney General. Any lawyer who represents state or local government in a criminal case may be called the prosecutor or the prosecuting attorney.

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The Alaska Supreme Court

The Alaska Supreme Court is the highest level of state court in Alaska. It hears appeals from lower state courts and also administers the state’s judicial system.

The Supreme Court includes the chief justice and four associate justices. The five justices, by majority vote, select one of their members to be the chief justice. The chief justice holds that office for three years and may not serve consecutive terms.

The Supreme Court hears oral argument in cases on a monthly basis in Anchorage, approximately each quarter in Fairbanks and Juneau, and on occasion in other Alaskan communities. The court prefers to hear oral argument in the judicial district where the case was originally heard by the trial court.

The court meets bi-weekly to confer on cases argued orally and cases submitted on the briefs – that is, without oral argument. The court decides the cases and publishes its decisions in one of three ways – as an Opinion, a Memorandum Opinion, and Judgment (MO&J), or an Order.

  1. Opinions explain in detail the legal reasoning supporting the decision and are published in the official Pacific Reporter and Alaska Reporter.
  2. Memorandum Opinions and Judgments (MO&Js) also explain the legal reasoning but are not published in the official reporters.
  3. Orders rule summarily on the merits of cases or dismiss them, include little or no legal reasoning, and are not published in the official reporters.

Although MO&Js and most Orders are not published, they are available for public inspection at the office of the clerk of the appellate courts. Current MO&Js are also available on the Alaska Court System website and through some subscription legal research services.

Under the state constitution, the Supreme Court establishes rules for the administration of all courts in the state, and for practice and procedure in civil and criminal cases. The Supreme Court also adopts rules for the practice of law in Alaska. The legislature may change the court’s procedural rules by passing an act expressing its intent to do so by a two-thirds majority of both houses.

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Supreme Court Jurisdiction

The term "jurisdiction" means a court’s legal power and authority to hear particular types of cases. The Supreme Court has final state appellate jurisdiction in civil and criminal matters as follows:

       
  1. Appeals. The Supreme Court must accept appeals from final decisions by the Superior Court in civil cases (including cases which originated in administrative agencies).
  2. Discretionary Matters. The Supreme Court may exercise its discretion to accept:

Alaska Court System Structure and Flow of Civil and Criminal Appeals Adobe Acrobat PDF logo

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Supreme Court Justices

Photo of Justice Dana Fabe

Chief Justice Dana Fabe has served on the Alaska Supreme Court since March 1996 and is the first woman to serve on the court. Chief Justice Fabe was born in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1951. She holds a B.A. degree from Cornell University and a J.D. degree from Northeastern University School of Law. Chief Justice Fabe clerked for Justice Edmond W. Burke of the Alaska Supreme Court in 1976-77. She served as a staff attorney for the Alaska Public Defender Agency from 1977-81, and in 1981 she was appointed by the governor to be Chief Public Defender for Alaska.  She was a member of the Board of Governors of the Alaska Bar Association in 1987-88. Chief Justice Fabe was appointed to the Superior Court bench in Anchorage in 1988 and was Deputy Presiding Judge of the Third Judicial District from 1992-95, as well as a Training Judge for the Third Judicial District. She served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court from July 2000-2003 and she was elected to a second term as Chief Justice from July 2006-2009.  During both terms as Chief Justice, she served as second vice-president of the Conference of Chief Justices. Chief Justice Fabe serves on the Advisory Council of the American Judicature Society and is chair of its Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee. She currently chairs the Alaska Supreme Court's Civil Rules Committee and the Alaska Court System's Law Day Steering Committee. She is co-chair of the Alaska Supreme Court's Fairness and Access Initiatives and chairs the Fairness, Diversity, and Equality Committee. She has served as co-chair of the Alaska Bar Association's Gender Equality Section, is the immediate past President of the National Association of Women Judges, and is a Life Fellow of the American Bar Foundation. Chief Justice Fabe is married to Randall Simpson and they have a daughter, Mia.

Photo of Justice Daniel E. Winfree

Justice Daniel E. Winfree joined the court in January of 2008. Justice Winfree was born in what then was the Territory of Alaska, and is a third-generation Fairbanksan. Between 1975 and 1978, he was a truck driver and warehouseman in pipeline camps and Prudhoe Bay working on the construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline and related projects on the North Slope. Justice Winfree earned a B.S. in Finance from the University of Oregon in 1977 and then earned M.B.A. and J.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1981. He was admitted to the Alaska Bar in 1982 and spent 25 years in private practice in Anchorage, Valdez, and Fairbanks, working with large and small firms and as a sole practitioner, before joining the court. Justice Winfree served on the Alaska Bar Association Board of Governors for nine years, including service as President in 1994-95 and related service as President of the Western States Bar Conference in 1997-98, and also served a term on the Ethics Committee and several terms on the Fee Arbitration Committee. The Alaska Bar Association presented him with its Distinguished Service Award in 2007. After his final term on the Board of Governors, he joined the Board of Trustees of the Alaska Bar Foundation and served as its President for two years. Justice Winfree is married to another third-generation Fairbanksan, Cathleen Ringstad Winfree, and they have two children.

Photo of Justice Craig Stowers

Justice Craig Stowers was appointed to the Alaska Supreme Court by Governor Sean Parnell on December 2, 2009. He was raised in Yorktown, Virginia. He majored in biology and received a bachelor’s degree with honors from Blackburn College in 1975. He was a Park Ranger at Colonial National Historical Park, and later transferred to Mount McKinley National Park, Alaska in 1977, where he worked as East District Naturalist and then West District Ranger. He earned his J.D. in 1985 from the University of California Davis School of Law (Order of the Coif). While in law school, he was employed for two years by Professor Daniel Fessler and the Alaska Code Revision Commission to research and prepare drafts of what became the Alaska Corporations Code, the Alaska Nonprofit Corporations Code, and the official commentary to those acts. He served as a judicial law clerk for Judge Robert Boochever of the United States Court of Appeals (Ninth Circuit) in Juneau, and then clerked for Justice Warren Matthews of the Alaska Supreme Court in Anchorage. Thereafter, he was a partner with Atkinson, Conway & Gagnon, and subsequently founded the Anchorage-Fairbanks law firm, Clapp, Peterson & Stowers. His law practice included trial practice, medical and attorney malpractice defense, business and insurance law, and complex civil litigation. He was appointed to the Alaska Superior Court in Anchorage in 2004 by Governor Frank Murkowski. During his legal and judicial career, he has served on various Alaska Bar Association committees, including the law examiners committee, and various Alaska Supreme Court committees, including the continuing judicial education committee. He also has served on several nonprofit corporation boards, including terms as board president of the Alaska Natural History Association (now known as Alaska Geographic) and board president of Christian Health Associates. He is happily married to his best friend, Monique Stowers.

Photo of Justice Peter Maassen

Justice Peter J. Maassen was appointed to the Alaska Supreme Court in August 2012 by Governor Sean Parnell. Born and raised in Michigan, Justice Maassen received a B.A. from Hope College in 1977 and a J.D. from the University of Michigan in 1980. Other than a two-year stint in Washington, D.C., where he worked in the General Counsel’s Office of the U.S. Department of Commerce and then for a private firm with a federal administrative practice, Justice Maassen spent most of his 30-year career in private practice in Anchorage. He was a partner of Burr, Pease & Kurtz, P.C., then in 1994 was a founding member of Ingaldson, Maassen & Fitzgerald, P.C. His civil litigation practice was varied and included many appeals. From 1994-2000 he served as editor in chief of the Alaska Bar Rag, the official publication of the Alaska Bar Association, and he was Alaska editor of the ABA’s Survey of State Class Action Law in 2003 and 2004. In 2006 he received the Professionalism Award from the Alaska Bar Association’s Board of Governors. He was a member of the Board of Governors from 2009-2012, serving as treasurer, president-elect, and discipline liaison. He continues to serve on the board of the Anchorage Youth Court, an alternative, peer-driven justice system for young offenders. He is a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation. He was a long-time member of the Supreme Court’s civil pattern jury instruction committee and now chairs the Supreme Court’s Access to Justice Committee and its judicial conference planning committee. He is married to Kay Gouwens, and they have a daughter, Lillian.

Photo of Justice Joel H. Bolger

Justice Joel H. Bolger Justice Joel H. Bolger was born and raised in western Iowa. He attended the University of Iowa, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Economics in 1976 and a Juris Doctor degree in 1978. He came to Alaska as a VISTA attorney with Alaska Legal Services Corporation in Dillingham, and then moved to the Supervising Attorney position for ALSC in Kodiak. Justice Bolger served as an Assistant Public Defender in Barrow, and then returned to Kodiak to join the firm of Jamin Ebell Bolger & Gentry. He worked as a private attorney from 1982-1997, including 14 years as municipal attorney for the Kodiak Island Borough. He served on the Board of Directors for ALSC from 1984-1987.

Justice Bolger was appointed to the District Court in Valdez by Governor Tony Knowles in 1997, to the Superior Court in Kodiak by Governor Frank Murkowski in 2003, to the Alaska Court of Appeals by Governor Sarah Palin in 2008, and to the Alaska Supreme Court by Governor Sean Parnell in 2013. He serves as co-chair of the Criminal Justice Working Group, and has also served on the Judicial Conference Planning Committee, the Appellate Rules Committee, the Criminal Pattern Jury Instructions Committee, the Fairness Diversity & Equality Committee, the Family Law Rules Committee, the Child Support Review Committee, the Alaska Bar Association CLE and Convention Steering Committees, as a Magistrate Training Judge, and as an alternate on the Three-Judge Sentencing Panel. Justice Bolger has been married to Cheryl Bolger since 1983, and they have two children, Stephanie and Jackson.


Justices of the Alaska Supreme Court
Justice
Term
Buell Nesbett August 1959 - March 1970
John H. Dimond August 1959 - December 1971
Walter H. Hodge August 1959 - February 1960
Harry O. Arend May 1960 - January 1965
Jay A. Rabinowitz February 1965 - February 1997
Roger G. Connor December 1968 - May 1983
George F. Boney December 1968 - August 1972
Robert C. Erwin August 1970 - April 1977
Robert Boochever March 1972 - October 1980
James M. Fitzgerald December 1972 - March 1975
Edmond W. Burke March 1975 - December 1993
Warren W. Matthews May 1977 - April 2009
Allen T. Compton December 1980 - November 1998
Daniel A. Moore, Jr. July 1983 - December 1995
Robert L. Eastaugh April 1994 - November 2009
Dana Fabe January 1996 -
Alexander O. Bryner February 1997 - October 2007
Walter L. Carpeneti November 1998 - January 2013
Daniel E. Winfree January 2008 -
Morgan Christen April 2009 - January 2012
Craig Stowers December 2009 -
Peter J. Maassen August 2012 -
Joel H. Bolger January 2013 -

Meet Alaska's Judges

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The Court of Appeals

The Court of Appeals is a three-judge court consisting of a chief judge and two associate judges. The Court of Appeals was created in 1980 by the Alaska Legislature. The chief judge of the Court of Appeals is appointed by the chief justice to serve a two-year term.

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Court of Appeals Jurisdiction

The Court of Appeals has jurisdiction to hear appeals in cases involving criminal prosecutions, post-conviction relief, juvenile delinquency, extradition, habeas corpus, probation and parole, bail, and the excessiveness or leniency of a sentence, as follows:

       
  1. Appeals. The Court of Appeals must accept appeals from final decisions by the Superior Court or the District Court in criminal cases. These include merit appeals (issues concerning the merits of a conviction) and sentence appeals (issues concerning the excessiveness or leniency of a sentence).
  2. Discretionary Matters. The Court of Appeals may exercise its discretion to accept:

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Court of Appeals Judges

Photo of Alaska Court of Appeals Chief Judge David Mannheimer and Judge Marjorie Allard

Alaska Court of Appeals: Chief Judge David Mannheimer and Judge Marjorie Allard
Not pictured: Judge Douglas H. Kossler

Court of Appeals Judges
Judge
Appointed
David Mannheimer, Chief Judge 1990
Marjorie K. Allard 2012
Douglas H. Kossler 2013

Meet Alaska's Judges

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The Clerk of the Appellate Courts

The clerk of the appellate courts supports the work of the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeals. The clerk is required to be an attorney. The clerk’s responsibilities include monitoring the caseflow through the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeals and making recommendations for improvements in appellate procedure. The clerk is also responsible for all case filing and calendaring, publishing opinions and related tasks. The clerk’s office is located in Anchorage.

Marilyn May was appointed Clerk of the Appellate Courts in October 1998.

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Trial Courts

Trial courts hear court cases when they are first initiated, and render decisions on the law and facts of cases that fall within their jurisdiction. The two levels of trial court in the Alaska Court System are the Superior Court and the District Court.

The trial courts in Alaska are divided into four judicial districts, whose boundaries are defined by statute. In January of each year, the chief justice of the Supreme Court designates a Superior Court judge from each of Alaska’s four judicial districts to serve as presiding judge for a term of one calendar year. The presiding judge, in addition to regular judicial duties, is responsible for the administration of the trial courts within the district, including assignment of cases, supervision of court personnel, efficient handling of court business and appointment of magistrate judges. Assisting the presiding judge with administrative responsibilities for each judicial district are the area court administrators.

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The Superior Court

The Superior Court is the trial court of general jurisdiction. There are 42 Superior Court judges located throughout the state. The Superior Court has the authority to hear all cases, both civil and criminal, properly brought before the state courts, with the very limited exception of matters taken directly to the Supreme Court. However, the Superior Court does not routinely hear cases that may be brought in the District Court, a court of limited jurisdiction.

Superior Court Jurisdiction

The Superior Court:

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The District Court

The District Court is a trial court of limited jurisdiction. Its powers are narrower than those of the Superior Court. At the time of Statehood in 1959, the Alaska legislature created a District Court for each judicial district and granted the Supreme Court the authority to increase or decrease the number of District Court judges within each judicial district. There are currently 23 District Court judges serving in three of the four judicial districts.

Magistrate judges are judicial officers of the District Court whose authority is more limited than the authority of a District Court judge. They preside over certain types of cases in areas of the state where services of a full-time District Court judge are not required. Some magistrate judges serve more than one court location. Magistrate judges also serve in metropolitan areas to handle routine matters and ease the workload of the District Court judges.   A magistrate judge is not required to be a lawyer.

District Court Judge Jurisdiction

A District Court judge may:

Magistrate Judge Jurisdiction

A magistrate judge may:

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Statewide Court Administration

As provided by Article IV, section 16 of the Constitution of Alaska, the Alaska Supreme Court appoints an administrative director to supervise the administrative operations of the judicial system. Christine Johnson has been the administrative director since 2009. Ms. Johnson is assisted by deputy director Doug Wooliver and 84 employees in the administrative office of the court.

The specific responsibilities of the administrative director and the administrative office are outlined in Rule 1 of the Alaska Court System Rules of Administration. These include supervising the administrative operations of the court and advising the chief justice and the Supreme Court in all matters not adjudicatory in nature. Sections within the administrative office include: Facilities, Fiscal Operations (including Accounting, Supply, Print Shop, Micrographics and Procurement), Legal and Legislative Liaison services, Mediation Projects Coordination, Judicial Education, Human Resources, Court Rules, Law Libraries and Information Systems (Technology).

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The Alaska Judicial Council

Although the terms judicial branch and court system are often used interchangeably, in fact, the judicial branch contains three separate entities: the Alaska Court System, the Alaska Judicial Council, and the Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct.

The Alaska Judicial Council is an independent judicial branch agency created by the Alaska Constitution with three main areas of responsibility. First, the council solicits and screens applicants for judgeships and the Alaska Public Defender, then nominates the most qualified applicants to the governor, who then makes the appointments. Second, the council evaluates each justice or judge who appears on the ballot in retention elections, publicizes the evaluations, and makes recommendations on whether each justice and judge should be retained. The council also evaluates retired judges who serve pro tem. Third, the constitution requires the council to conduct studies and make recommendations to improve the administration of justice in Alaska.

The Alaska Judicial Council is composed of:

Council members serve staggered six year terms and are appointed with due consideration of geographical location but without regard for political interests or affiliations.

The Alaska Judicial Council must report to the Alaska State Legislature and the Alaska Supreme Court at least once every two years. The council is assisted by an executive director and support staff. For more information, call (907) 279-2526 or visit the Alaska Judicial Council website.

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The Judicial Appointment Process

Alaska’s Constitution provides for the merit selection of judges. Merit selection is a way of choosing judges based on their qualifications, rather than their political or social connections. In 1959, Alaska was one of only two states that used the merit selection system. Today, 33 states and the District of Columbia select some or all of their judges this way.

The Alaska Judicial Council, an independent citizens’ commission, is required to investigate and evaluate judicial applicants for the Supreme Court, Court of Appeals, Superior Court and District Court. The council sends the names of the most qualified applicants to the governor, and the governor then has 45 days to make an appointment from the list.

To be eligible for appointment to the appellate courts (Supreme Court or Court of Appeals), a person must be a citizen of the United States, a resident of Alaska for five years immediately prior to appointment, licensed to practice law in Alaska at the time of appointment, and have engaged in the active practice of law for the preceding eight years.

To be eligible for appointment to the Superior Court, a person must meet the same qualifications as appellate judges, with the exception that only five years of prior active practice of law are necessary.

A District Court judge must be 21 years of age, a citizen of the United States, a resident of Alaska for at least five years, and either (1) be licensed to practice law in Alaska and have engaged in active practice of law for not less than three years immediately preceding appointment, or (2) have served for at least seven years as a magistrate judge in Alaska and have graduated from an accredited law school.

Magistrate judges are not appointed by the governor, but instead by the presiding judge of the judicial district in which they serve. Accordingly, magistrate judges are not subject to the same appointment process that applies to judges, and they are not evaluated by the Alaska Judicial Council prior to their appointments. Magistrate judges do not have to be lawyers, but they must be 21 years of age, a United States citizen, and a citizen of Alaska for six months prior to appointment.

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Judicial Retention Process

Under Alaska law, all justices and judges in Alaska must stand periodically for approval (“retention”) by the voters on a nonpartisan ballot in a general election. A justice or judge must receive a majority of the vote to remain on the bench. The length of time between retention elections varies by court. Supreme Court justices, Court of Appeals judges, and Superior Court judges must stand for retention three years after their appointment. Thereafter, Supreme Court justices face retention every ten years; Court of Appeals judges face retention every eight years; and Superior Court judges face retention every six years. District Court judges stand for retention two years after their appointment, then every four years thereafter. Magistrate judges are not required by law to stand for retention and are not subject to the same retention process that applies to judges.

The Alaska Judicial Council evaluates the performance of justices and judges facing retention and provides detailed information and recommendations to voters. The  Council informs voters about judicial evaluations and its recommendations about retention through its website, inclusion of information in the Lieutenant Governor's Election Pamphlets, and through publication in a variety of media. Thousands of Alaskans are surveyed, including attorneys, peace and probation officers, jurors, court employees, and others. A study of retention election outcomes by the American Judicature Society reports that Alaska voters take the Alaska Judicial Council’s ratings into account when casting their ballots.

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The Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct

Although the terms judicial branch and court system are often used interchangeably, in fact, the judicial branch contains three separate entities: the Alaska Court System, the Alaska Judicial Council, and the Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct.

The Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct is a constitutionally created state agency in the judicial branch that investigates complaints of ethical misconduct against state judges and justices. The commission consists of nine members:

The commission is administered by an executive director and support staff, which screen many complaints before they are filed with the commission.

The Commission on Judicial Conduct has the power to recommend sanctions against a justice or judge, which may include suspension, removal from the bench, retirement from office, or public or private censure. While most proceedings before the commission are confidential, hearings are open to the public if the commission determines that formal charges against a judge or justice should be filed. Special committees of the commission draft advisory opinions in response to written requests.

For more information visit the Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct website or call (800) 478-1033 or (907) 272-1033.

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Rev. 16 June 2014
© Alaska Court System

www.courts.alaska.gov
webmaster@courts.state.ak.us

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