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Alaska Appellate Courts

303 K Street, Anchorage, AK 99501-2084
907-264-0612

Alaska Court System business hours are Monday - Friday, 8:00 am - 4:30 pm.
Court offices are closed all state-observed holidays.

Appellate Forms & Publications | Appellate Rules | Case Management System | Filing Fees | Opinion Notification Service | Oral Arguments | Self-Help Appeals | Slip Opinions | State of the Judiciary | Matters Under Advisement

There are two appellate courts in Alaska: the supreme court and the court of appeals. The supreme court was established by the Alaska Constitution, and the court of appeals was created by the Alaska Legislature in 1980.

The supreme court is the highest level of state court in Alaska. It hears appeals from lower state courts and also administers the state's judicial system.

The court of appeals has the authority to hear appeals in cases involving criminal prosecution, post-conviction relief, juvenile delinquency, extradition, habeas corpus, probation and parole, bail, and sentencing matters.

The Appellate Clerk's Office supports the work of the appellate courts. The clerk's responsibilities include monitoring the caseflow through the appellate courts and making recommendations for improvements in appellate procedure. The clerk is also responsible for all case filing and calendaring, publishing opinions and related tasks. The clerk's office is located in Anchorage.

Additional information about the judges and justices, jurisdiction, and composition of Alaska's courts is available on the Court Information page.

Appellate Forms & Publications

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Appellate Rules

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Appellate Case Management System

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Filing Fees

Filing fees are set forth in Administrative Rule 9, Fee Schedule.

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Opinion Notification Service

The appellate clerk's office offers an appellate slip opinion notification service: the ak-slip-opinions listserv.

Each week subscribers receive a message providing a list of the opinions and MOJs issued by the supreme court and court of appeals that week. The message includes the case type and a link to the PDF version of the document posted on the court's website.

Any interested person may sign up for this free service. To subscribe, or to unsubscribe, go to http://list.state.ak.us/soalists/ak-slip-opinions/jl.htm

If you think you’ve missed an email from the listserv, check your email server’s spam filter to verify that messages from the subscription service are not blocked or filtered by your system. Outlook users should also check for messages in the “Junk E-Mail” folder.

To retrieve previously published messages from archives, go to http://list.state.ak.us/soalists/ak-slip-opinions/a/.

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Oral Arguments

The public is welcome to attend appellate court oral arguments:

Anchorage arguments are held in the fifth floor courtroom of the Boney Courthouse building at 303 K Street.

Fairbanks arguments are held in the Rabinowitz Courthouse, Courtroom 502, fifth floor, 101 Lacey Street.

Juneau arguments are held in Courtroom A, first floor, Dimond Courthouse.

Alaska supreme court oral arguments are broadcast on Gavel to Gavel Alaska on cable systems throughout the state. Contact your local cable provider for channel information. For an exact broadcast schedule, visit the Gavel to Gavel website or contact them at 1-800-870-5866. Gavel to Gavel Alaska also archives the audio of many cases before the supreme court.

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If you are not able to access any of the calendars listed below, please contact the Alaska Appellate Courts at 907-264-0612 for assistance.

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Self-Help Appeals

The Alaska Supreme Court has a website that discusses how to represent yourself in an appeal of a civil final judgment or order from the Superior Court to the Supreme Court. It discusses how to:

It does NOT discuss how to file an appeal in a criminal case to the Court of Appeals.

The civil appeals process is complicated, time consuming and expensive. The process can take over two years from start to finish. You should consult with an attorney if possible to discuss your case. If you are going to represent yourself for the appeal, it is important to read ALL of the information provided on the self-help appeals website before filing your appeal. The website provides detailed information about each part of the appeal process, including forms and instructions.

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Slip Opinions and Memorandum Opinions (MOJs)

Slip opinions are issued Fridays after 9:00 a.m. and are retained on the court's website until they are published in the official reporter of Alaska appellate decisions - Pacific Reporter (P.2d and P.3d), and the Alaska Reporter, which contains the Alaska cases excerpted from P.2d and P.3d. The Pacific Reporter or the Alaska Reporter is available at most Alaska Court System law libraries and some public libraries.

MOJs are issued Wednesday mornings, and posted on the court's website for informational purposes. MOJs are without precedential effect and may not be cited in the courts of the State of Alaska (Appellate Rule 214). They are retained on court's website for three months. Older MOJs may be obtained from the Appellate Clerk's Office (907) 264-0612.

Case-Related Orders issued by the Supreme Court are posted to the court's website on the day they are released, and are retained until they are published in the official reporter of Alaska appellate decisions - Pacific Reporter (P.2d and P.3d), and the Alaska Reporter, which contains the Alaska cases excerpted from P.2d and P.3d. The Pacific Reporter or the Alaska Reporter is available at most Alaska Court System law libraries and some public libraries.

All opinions and some MOJs back to 1960 are available in the law library's Alaska Case Law Service.

You will need to download a free copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader in order to view and print opinions and MOJs in PDF. If you are unable to access the PDF format, please contact the webmaster@courts.state.ak.us

Please report errors found in opinions and MOJs to:

Clerk of the Appellate Courts
303 K Street
Anchorage, Alaska 99501
phone: 907-264-0608
fax: 907-264-0878
email: corrections@appellate.courts.state.ak.us.

The appellate clerk's office offers an appellate slip opinion notification service.

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State of the Judiciary

Chief Justice Dana Fabe's 2014 State of the Judiciary Address

State of the Judiciary Addresses: 2001 - Current Year

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Matters Under Advisement

Under Alaska law, a pay check may not be issued to a judicial officer until the judicial officer has filed an affidavit affirming that no matter referred to the judicial officer has been uncompleted or undecided for more than six months. This provision is known as "the six-month rule."

For the Alaska Supreme Court, the six-month rule starts to run when the case is taken under advisement by the five members of the court. In order to be under advisement, the case must be ready to be decided by the court. Normally, the date the case is taken under advisement is the date of oral argument or the court’s conference on the case if no oral argument is requested, although on occasion that date may be different in the event of requested supplemental briefing, reassignment to another justice, or other events that affect the date when the case is ready to be decided by the court. Once the case has been assigned to an individual justice to write the opinion, or in the words of the statute, has been “referred to the justice for opinion” (which cannot happen until the court has discussed the case after oral argument and knows which justices are in the majority), that justice has six months to complete the draft opinion and circulate it for voting by the rest of the court. This is the portion of the opinion that is within the control of the individual justice. Draft opinions are usually issued much more quickly than six months, in most cases within 90 days of the case being taken under advisement. Once all voting is complete by all individual justices, all voting suggestions have been incorporated during the reconciliation process, and any separate opinions have been prepared and voted upon, the draft is ready to be proofread and prepared for publication. About 75% of all Supreme Court appeals are published within nine months from the date they were taken under advisement.

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Rev. 10 June 2014
© Alaska Court System

www.courts.alaska.gov
webmaster@courts.state.ak.us

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